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They found a huge 2000-year-old ship in the Mediterranean

They found a huge 2000-year-old ship in the Mediterranean


They found a huge 2000-year-old ship in the Mediterranean
They found a huge 2000-year-old ship in the Mediterranean 

Archeologists have found the remaining parts of "significant" Roman ship off the shore of the Greek islands in the biggest wreck situated in the eastern Mediterranean and one of the biggest remains that can be found in the whole ocean. 

The ship was conveying a huge number of boats containing wine, olive oil, nuts, wheat or grain when it sank. 

It has been situated on the ocean bottom for right around 2000 years when it was found by sonar during an examination spreading over from 2013 to 2014, as indicated by T + L reports.

According to a circular to be published in January from the journal "Archeology", Fiscardo - as archaeologists have called the ship, dates back to the first century BC. And the first century AD, when the Roman Empire ruled the region.

The ship is unusually long - about 34 meters. Most other ships at this time are about 15 meters long.

The wreck is about 2.5 km from the entrance to the port of Fiskardo - a village on the Greek island of Kefalonia.

Researchers believe that the port was perhaps an important commercial center during the Roman era.

Archaeologists are still revolving around what to do with the treasures found in the remains. It is too expensive to have them landed.

The first step is to remove a vessel for DNA analysis. Archaeologists will then try to find an investor to finance additional dive into the remains.

"The ship is buried half of it in the bottom sludge, so we have high expectations that in the event of any future excavations, some or all of the wooden hulls will be discovered," George Ferentinos, who heads the study, told the New Scientist newspaper.

"This could tell archaeologists when and where the ship was made, where the material came from and how it was repaired."

The researchers hope any new discoveries from the ship will help discover more about shipbuilding and shipping in ancient times.

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